2020 Subaru Forester, 2020 Outback, 2020 Crosstrek
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Subaru Defective Windshield Lawsuit Now Includes Many 2020 Models

The defective windshield class-action lawsuit against Subaru expands to include 2020 Forester, Outback, Crosstrek, Legacy, and Impreza models.
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The class-action lawsuit seeking damages against Subaru for defective windshields has expanded this week.

In October of last year, Torque News reported a lawsuit was filed on behalf of Christine Powell by attorney Peter Muhic of Philadelphia and attorneys for a Pittsburgh-based firm, Carlson Lynch LLC contends 2017-2019 Subaru Forester, Outback, and Crosstrek models have defective windshields.

Watch which Subaru cars are included in the defective windshield class-action lawsuit and click to subscribe to Torque News Youtube for daily automotive news reports.

Now, according to a report from Top Class Actions, 15 new plaintiffs have been added to the lawsuit adding 2020 Subaru Forester, 2020 Subaru Outback, 2020 Subaru Crosstrek, 2017-2020 Subaru Legacy and 2017-2020 Subaru Impreza vehicles. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration also received complaints from Subaru owners who experienced issues with their windshields, according to the consolidated class action.

2020 Subaru Forester, 2020 Outback, 2020 Crosstrek
2020 Subaru models are added to the new class-action lawsuit

The revised lawsuit claims Subaru manufactured, marketed, distributed, and sold the cars “without disclosing that the class vehicles’ windshields are defective and dangerous due to the fact that the windshields are spontaneously and/or unreasonably cracking, chipping and otherwise breaking,”

According to the new class-action lawsuit filed in February, Subaru “failed to disclose material facts and a safety concern to purchasers and leasees of the class vehicles.” The new complaint combines Christine Powell’s original lawsuit with two additional class action cases over Subaru’s windshields that were filed in California and New Jersey.

2020 Subaru Forester, 2020 Outback, 2020 Crosstrek
2020 Subaru Outback is Subaru of America’s top-selling model

According to court documents, Subaru issued a technical bulletin to its dealers describing the alleged defect in its windshields. Plaintiffs in the case say replacement windshields for Forester, Outback, Crosstrek, Legacy and Impreza models are not fixing the problem and contend the defect prevents "the safe and proper operation" of technology intended to prevent collisions.

Subaru uses the EyeSight driver assist safety system attached to the inside of the upper windshield and the lawsuit contends cracks in the windshield hamper the safety system from working properly. All plaintiffs are seeking a trial by jury.

What should Forester, Outback, Crosstrek, Impreza, and Legacy owners do?

If you own a 2017-2020 Subaru Outback, Forester, Crosstrek, Impreza, or Legacy model and have experienced a cracked windshield for no apparent reason, you can file a complaint with the NHTSA by going to the website link, or call 1-888-327-4236. Or you can submit your contact information and an attorney from Carlson Lynch will be in touch to review your case further.

You Might Also Like: With The Wrong Wiper Blades Or Tires Your Subaru EyeSight Could Fail

Denis Flierl has invested over 30 years in the automotive industry in a variety of roles. All of his reports are archived on our Subaru page. Follow Denis on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Subaru Report. Check back tomorrow for more Subaru news and updates at Torque News!

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Comments

I have had 3 windshields replaced and 'recalibration' was never done once. According to Jack Morris Auto Glass in Memphis, calibration is not necessary. My Subaru dealer does not do glass replacement, the send everyone to Jack Morris.
Adam, if it weren't for these lawyers suing, we would have more lives destroyed and/or lost for any number of reasons. I worked as a paralegal on both sides of numerous defective products, and I can tell you that I hated working on the manufacturers side. Why? Because I read all the documents specifically relating to what was wrong, why it was wrong, how much (or little) it would take to fix, and then why the manufacturers didn't want to take the blame and just fix the problem! I couldn't sleep at night worrying about the people who had been hurt by the company I was helping evade liability. When I switched to the plaintiff side, I felt better about myself. I knew I was legitimately helping someone get compensated for a defective object or a malicious action or medical malpractice or similar act. You want to gripe about rising costs, don't blame the lawyers representing the plaintiffs. Blame the lawyers representing
Yeh but how many windshields actually broke and spider webbed so badly that you couldn't see and crashed. They deserve to sue. But if you had a window that cracked and did t get it repaired in time and it got worse it's on you. Very cheap to repair most insurances to that for free with full coverage. I'm talking about the crazy lawsuits of people that try to make problems . Or someone slipping on ice at your property sidewalk but they were drunk . It's a fine line and a grey area and people take advantage way to much .
I too drive a 2019 Ascent and out of the blue the windshield cracked rapidly about a month ago. I called Subaru and they told me it was my responsibility to have it fixed.
This same thing happened to me. I was driving and a tumble weed hit my windshield and I got a small web. Went to chip repair and paid $40 out of pocket (no, I don’t want insurance to be involved) then a few days later, my car sat in the sun (summer) all of a sudden, a line of crack going across my windshield. My dad was telling me, “why is their windshield so easily crack?” And so went to replace it and cost me over $800 with OEM glass as my package have the eyesight and windshield wipers defroster.
Being in the back business 25 years repairing rock chip damage, i have seen so-called rock chip repair techs that don't know how to repair a chip properly. Once a chip is repaired correctly it will not crack out! Make sure that tech is certified NWRA.
Typical Subaru. It seems you have to open a class-action suit for them to fix their problems. I know because I have one of the 2011 Foresters that had a defective short block and had to be replaced. It took a class-action suit before Subaru did anything. Now this with the defective windshields has convinced me that this is my last Subaru.
My windshield cracked when a small rock or pebble hit my windshield in Utah. It rapidly became a large crack. I have owned other brands and never had the windshield crack due to something hitting windshield. My insurance company replaced it with a Subaru windshield. Maybe I should have gone with another after market brand.
2017 Impreza owner since 11/16 and no windshield cracks here.
Replaced windshield from defroster problem
Arizona, Kentucky, Florida, Massachusetts and South Carolina - Zero deductible states where the law requires that cracked windshields are replaced without deductible. Should keep Subie sales going strong and legal costs to a minimum there. Poor lawyers.
I haven’t had the windshield cracking issue. My issue is windows in the entire car fogging up to the point where you can’t see out of the windows. Eye-sight turns off. Also a dangerous situation.
I agree that the Ascent should be listed as well. I've had my 2020 Ascent for only a week and I now have two dings after two tiny pebbles (not at the same time) hit my windshield. This was an expensive purchase to begin with and now I'm having to worry about an expensive repair cost a week later.
my airbag exploded when a car backed up into my front at a red light, smashing the windshield out and the rear view mirror.
I have a 2013 Legacy with the same problem -- replaced the windshield due to "stress crack" all the way across. Winter comes and first day in the teens the new windshield has the same crack as the last one.
2018 Subaru Forester Touring...windshield has chips but no crack (yet). This was my first Subaru and it will be my last, other issues associated with it that drive me nuts: 1) Constant alarms (do I really need to be told the vehicle in front of me has moved while I'm looking right at it), lane departure, beeps...I'm afraid to back up now since the alarms are insane...the other day the alarm started beeping and I put on the brake only to learn it was caused by another vehicle parking four spaces away...the inside of the vehicle is cheaply made and I am seeing the same on the exterior. My seat belt and I have been wrestling since day one...it keeps hanging up and I can't seem to get it to simply snap into place without a fight. My seat position will change as I am sitting in the vehicle pushing me against the steering wheel and elevates me at the same time, really??? I travel a lot, rent vehicles on a regular basis and I can honestly say not a single one of the rentals I've had beeps, or has elevated my blood pressure as the Subaru does. I really thought this was going to be a nice vehicle...silly me (never, ever, again).
I purchased two 2015 crosstrek xvs and both have broken for no reason.
I got 4 huge cracks within 1 month of owning my new outback. I thought it was strange how quickly a new chip to long crack developed. And no one has replacements. I even bought the plan that replaces the windshield at no cost.
We had a crack in our Subaru 2019 to replace it cost our insurance company 3000
My 2020 Outback windshield cracked the day after I brought it home. I had to argue with the Dealership to get them to replace it. They never once mentioned this during that time.
What recommendation do you have for us who are in the process of purchasing a new Subaru?? Go somewhere else for a different brand? Thanks
On June 30, 2018, I was driving my 2018 Subaru Crosstrek Limited Edition on my way to work. I heard a noise while driving but kept driving since I was just blocks away to work. I parked in the monitored parking lot and visually looked inside and outside my car for some indication of where the noise came from, including the windshield from the inside and outside. I saw no cracks to the windshield or other area of the vehicle. It was hot outside (90's).I went in to work. When I got off work I went out to my car. I got inside my car, immediately noticing a 6-8 inch long crack on the driver's side of the front windshield. I went home in shock about the large crack in my windshield. I later contacted my insurance company, and was told my deductible and to call around to find quotes on replacement. I was told by all the auto shops including my local Subaru dealer the entire windshield would need replaced but the car was so new that they didn't have the parts in stock and didn't know how long it would be since the car was so new. I didn't get the windshield replaced .I felt that Subaru should be responsible for a new windshield as the car was only purchased new 9 months before. I did not have the money to go through my insurance at the time and I was told by my local dealer that Subaru did not cover the windshield in the warranty on the car. However, I believe the defect of the windshield prevents the safe and proper operation of the vehicle because Subaru's EyeSight safety system, intended to prevent collisions, is attached to the inside of the upper windshield. I did research online at the time if other owners had complaints, but the car was so new I only found one. Now, a search reveals many complaints of defective windshields and a class action lawsuit. I worry about my safety still and I believe Subaru should be held accountable for the replacement of the windshield.
The ' Eyesight System" is behind the windshield as it is inside the car, bur it is NOT attached to the windshield in any way.
On June 30, 2019, I was driving my 2018 Subaru Crosstrek Limited Edition on my way to work. I heard a noise while driving but kept driving since I was just blocks away to work. I parked in the monitored parking lot and visually looked inside and outside my car for some indication of where the noise came from, including the windshield from the inside and outside. I saw no cracks to the windshield or other area of the vehicle. It was hot outside (90's).I went in to work. When I got off work I went out to my car. I got inside my car, immediately noticing a 6-8 inch long crack on the driver's side of the front windshield. I went home in shock about the large crack in my windshield. I later contacted my insurance company, and was told my deductible and to call around to find quotes on replacement. I was told by all the auto shops including my local Subaru dealer the entire windshield would need replaced but the car was so new that they didn't have the parts in stock and didn't know how long it would be since the car was so new. I didn't get the windshield replaced .I felt that Subaru should be responsible for a new windshield as the car was only purchased new 9 months before. I did not have the money to go through my insurance at the time and I was told by my local dealer that Subaru did not cover the windshield in the warranty on the car. However, I believe the defect of the windshield prevents the safe and proper operation of the vehicle because Subaru's EyeSight safety system, intended to prevent collisions, is attached to the inside of the upper windshield. I did research online at the time if other owners had complaints, but the car was so new I only found one. Now, a search reveals many complaints of defective windshields and a class action lawsuit. I worry about my safety still and I believe Subaru should be held accountable for the replacement of the windshield.
I had my windshield replaced. Total cost before tax was $414.95 for windshield + $144.00 labor + $30.00 adhesive + $79.95 moulding = Total of $668.90. I paid $100 deductible and insurance co. paid the rest. (2020 Outback)
I have a 2019 Impreza. My first windshield cracked 18 months into ownership. I had it replaced at a Subaru dealership with OEM glass. Cost close to $1000 for the whole job. Now, 9 months later, I have a brand new crack that's huge. Something is definitely wrong with this glass. It's way to susceptible to cracking. I have never had a car with windshields so fragile. I'm tempted to go aftermarket now, as the Carlex glass that Subaru uses has failed me twice.
I had the windshield replaced on my 2019 Outback in December 2019 and Subaru paid for it under warranty. In April this year, the new one cracked underneath the windshield wiper blade. This time the dealer is claiming it was due to a rock chip and denied the claim. This is BS!!!! I thought there was something with where the windshield was set into the body, but it is now obvious it is the glass that is prone to cracking. I am calling up the food chain at Subaru to see where I can get there, but it seems inevitable I need to join the class action suit.
2020 Ascent SHOULD be added. Within 3-weeks of purchase, chips, etches and crack all the way across windshield. Replaced and within 40 miles noticed small chips and etches starting again. There's obviously a problem with the product or design. For every complaint reported how many have not?
is there any news about windshield subaru ascent models? had it fixed. 3x back to fix a noise at 60mph finally packing came flying out job done thru allstate insurance presently waiting for new windshield

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