2020 Subaru Outback, 2020 Subaru Forester
Denis Flierl's picture

The New Subaru Outback And Forester Now Score A 10-Best Cars For Road Trips

When it comes to getting away Subaru has the best road trip vehicles according to a new report. See why the 2020 Subaru Forester and Outback are ranked two of the 10 best.
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If you are like everyone else, you are done with being in quarantine and you can’t wait to get on the road. Consumer Reports has a new report out that says the 2020 Subaru Forester and newly redesigned Outback are two of the 10-Best road trip vehicles you can buy right now. What makes then the best?

It’s about a vehicle offering front and rear seat comfort, cargo space, fuel economy, ride quality, quiet inside the cabin, and has strong safety scores and reliability. CR says the two Subaru models check all the right boxes and they are “road-trip warriors.”

2020 Subaru Outback, 2020 Subaru Forester

The Forester falls in the compact SUV segment with other popular models Toyota RAV4 and Honda CR-V. The Outback is in the wagon category all by itself, but many consider it a crossover utility vehicle or CUV.

Both get pretty decent fuel mileage with the Forester coming in at combined 28 mpg and 20/39 city/highway mpg and Outback getting an EPA estimated combined 24 mpg and 16/32 city/highway mpg.

2020 Subaru Outback, 2020 Subaru Forester

Subaru’s flagship 2020 Forester has a price range of $24,495 - $34,595 and the popular Outback is a bit more at $26,645 - $39,695. Safety is a strong point for both models and both Forester and Outback scored Top Safety Pick+ awards with the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS).

Three Subaru models make the list with the 2020 Legacy sedan also recommended as a Top-10 road trip vehicle. Like the Outback, the sedan received a complete remodel for the 2020 model year.

The 2020 Subaru Forester is now the Camden, N.J. automaker’s best selling vehicle in the stable and Outback is number two. What CR didn’t say was a vehicle should also come with all-wheel-drive in case you feel like exploring off-pavement. All three vehicles offer it as standard equipment.

You Might Also Like: You'll Be Glad You Have A New Subaru Forester And Ascent Feature This Summer

Denis Flierl has invested over 30 years in the automotive industry in a variety of roles. All of his reports are archived on our Subaru page. Follow Denis on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Subaru Report. Check back tomorrow for more Subaru news and updates at Torque News!

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Comments

I have no idea how these reports come out and say they are good road trip cars.I have a 2019 Forester sport and had a 2015 Crosstrek prior to upgrading to the Forester.Ok,they may be spacious ,pretty comfortable on the highway and somehow safe,but you can't tell me you can have a great road trip car if you can have comfortable seats.I have no idea how long these guys drive them for.It takes only one hour into the trip for your back and bottom to ache like crazy.The seats are the worst thing about the Subarus,they are just horrible(my opinion).You don't feel anything if you travel somewhere close ,but after an hour you want to get out,they are just that bad.Also,I would say the build quality is horrible as well.My 2015 Crosstrek had many different squeaks and noises coming from the dashboard,and the Forester seems to be even worse,every few months a new noise starts to appear.You just can't have a good road trip car when you can't sit comfortably for a few hours straight and hearing squeaks and rattles that piss you off,you just can't relax entirely when you have those simple yet very important things wrong.
If your Crosstalk was so poorly assembled, why did you buy a '19 Forester? No, I believe your "observation" is disengenuous, and just meant to criticize the brand. I've had a '11 Outback, a '17 Impreza Sport, & now a '19 Forester. They all were great on the interstates, ( 5 trips a year to my daughter 800 miles away). And 30+ mpg @75 mph
Marcin is absolutely correct, the seats in the Forester has no lumbar support. My back aches for days after the drive. Coupled with the huge expanse of windows but weak A/C and it’s uncomfortable during hot summer months without setting the fan to high. The brakes are prone to fading too, so expect them to warp in successive panic stops (infrequent) or long mountain passes. Cruise control to “downshift” doesn’t help as much as you’d think in those circumstances. Speaking of mountains, expect the 2.5 to drone and hamper conversations or disturb those napping. Forget the stereo working since there’s multiple reports of the Bluetooth portion failing across multiple Foresters.
Very good assessment there's a few things that I have issue with they say they're off road machines but they have nothing but plastic underneath no protection for the oil pan so that doesn't make a very solid off road vehicle instead of putting some of the beepers and buzzers in there I should put some skid plates how much could that cost for $25,000 car for a $35,000 car
I can agree about the seats, but then I didn't buy it new. I have a used but loved Legacy that is nearing 240k klm's and has no noise of any description. I have had it for more than 6 years and have not put a spanner on it(touch wood). First Subaru I've ever owned. If this is a taste, I am having more. Best car I have ever had (simple). Seats are simply fixed with a cushion.
I disagree, I have spent 6 to 8 hours in these seats and they are far from the worst....average yes. But if you are not stretching your legs so often say 3 to 4 hours you are definetely A personality and probably don`t enjoy road trips.
Your gas mileage for the Outback is incorrect. You should correct it, so as not to point people away. For the 2.5 engine, it is: 26c, 33h, 29 combined For the 2.4 turbo, it is: 23c, 30h, 26 combined
My 2017 Outback Touring 2.5 has eyesight and all the bells and whistles and while it isn't self driving, you can safely gaze out of the window on properly marked wide open roads and just enjoy the view for a few moments, and the wheel and car well let you know if you're steering out of lane and correct it. While paying attention is paramount to safety. It's the best to have a feature that assists with the momentary distractions. I've driven from Texas to many parts of the west coast and in between. And its 12 hours just to get out of TX. So I know about long drives. Through mountains and deserts and every kind of terrible weather. And felt like it couldn't have been easier in this outback. The longest I driven was 32+/- hours over 2 days at 16 hours a day, driving from north California to south central Texas. Idk if they contruct the cushions of the leather seats in my touring trim differently or more comfortable than lower trim levels. But as a 6ft 190lbs man I find myself comfortable, and needing to stretch every 2 or 3 hours. Even with the 12 way, or whatever, adjustable seat I still sometimes have to use cushions for anything over a 6 hour trip. I pull a small camper(runaway coolcamp) with my outback. And it pulls good and steady @ 150lbs hitch weight & 1400lbs total. With cruise control @60/65 I manage 22mpg avg.
My 2017 Outback Touring 2.5 has eyesight and all the bells and whistles and while it isn't self driving, you can safely gaze out of the window on properly marked wide open roads and just enjoy the view for a few moments, and the wheel and car well let you know if you're steering out of lane and correct it. While paying attention is paramount to safety. It's the best to have a feature that assists with the momentary distractions. I've driven from Texas to many parts of the west coast and in between. And its 12 hours just to get out of TX. So I know about long drives. Through mountains and deserts and every kind of terrible weather. And felt like it couldn't have been easier in this outback. The longest I driven was 32+/- hours over 2 days at 16 hours a day, driving from north California to south central Texas. Idk if they contruct the cushions of the leather seats in my touring trim differently or more comfortable than lower trim levels. But as a 6ft 190lbs man I find myself comfortable, and needing to stretch every 2 or 3 hours. Even with the 12 way, or whatever, adjustable seat I still sometimes have to use cushions for anything over a 6 hour trip. I pull a small camper(runaway coolcamp) with my outback. And it pulls good and steady @ 150lbs hitch weight & 1400lbs total. With cruise control @60/65 I manage 22mpg avg.
I have a 2015 Outback limited and it’s great car but I had to go to Walmart and buy seat cushions. There not comfortable and the passenger seat sits so low you look right at the glove compartment. Not good. No skid plates, not good off road if your oil pan gets a leak, your not going anywhere.
I'm sorry,I didn't need to offend anybody.Its just my opinion based on owning two new Subarus in the past 5 years.I bought a Forester,because I needed something bigger,more spacious(which is great).Went with the Forester,because I always liked how they look(more boxy than the other competitors) as well as a little bit cheaper and didn't want to wait and could not afford the new outback.The 2.5 in the Forester is plenty fast for me,it's very adequate and of course I wish I could get a manual,but they stopped offering it in the 2019.However,when it comes to seats,squeaks and rattles,I just didn't think it was going to be that bad,I wanted to give a Subaru a chance.I though if I go from a basic manual Crosstrek and go with the Forester sport,things would improve.Believe me things did improve,it's a much different and better car,but after driving it for 21k miles,I don't think I can't stand the seats any longer.The rattles,I can somehow live with.So ,sorry if I offended some of you, I didn't mean to.
I have been looking for new seats for my '18 Forester since I got it. It is NOT a road trip vehicle. A cushion helps. Other than that, its a winner.
Not happy with my 2015 outback. The 4 cylinder engine is noisy but especially so in the winter. The interior is not very quiet. I have 89k miles and have had to replace wheel bearings and exhaust manifold. My 2004 Accord was hands down a better vehicle.