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Ford Escape Plug-In Hybrid Pricing Starts At $34,235

At last, pricing has been released for the Ford Escape Plug-In Hybrid lineup. The lineup, which features batteries that are 13 times larger than other Escape hybrid models, includes four models from the SE to the top-of-the-line Titanium.
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Much of the time, if you were able to look over the shoulder of an internet user reading a story about new-car pricing, you would see it is pretty slumber-inducing. And, if you could watch others who were reading the same material, you would also find their eyelids growing heavier and heavier with each mention of a vehicle’s base price. By the time they reach the end of the article, the mere mention of the sleep-inducing words destination fees has everyone looking at the article nodding off with snores aplenty leaving the room.

Excitement Builds Around Ford Escape Plug-In Hybrid

This year, though, you certainly can’t say there would be snoring about the Ford Escape Plug-In Hybrid. Green Car Reports revealed news coming from Cars Direct, both parts of the same publishing group, that Ford will introduce the manufacturer’s first-ever plug-in hybrid in the second quarter of 2020. The Escape has been line has been redesigned for 2020.

The 2020 Escape SE Plug-In Hybrid carries a largish battery for all-electric use. At 14.4-kwh, it is 13 times larger than the 1.1-kwh standard battery pack used in the rest of the Escape Hybrid lineup.

Green Car Reports relayed pricing information from CarsDirect. CarsDirect saw a dealer ordering guide from which it was able to determine 2020 Escape Plug-In Hybrid pricing. For 2020, the Ford Escape SE Plug-In Hybrid starts at $34,235, including the destination fee. Like the standard 2020 Escapes, the Escape SE Plug-In Hybrid features an array of safety tech. The safety tech includes automatic emergency braking with pedestrian detection, blind-spot warning, and automatic high beams. Other extras include post-collision braking and a “pedestrian alert sounder.”

Ford Escape Plug-In Hybrid Features Aluminum Wheels

The Escape SE Plug-In Hybrid features 18-inch aluminum wheels, LED headlights and taillights, tinted glass, and a six-inch touchscreen with SYNC 3. Its voice-activated NAV system pairs with the adaptive cruise control option. It is a $695 option. The Escape SEL Plug-In Hybrid starts at $36,815 and features a hands-free power liftgate, fog lights, roof rails, remote starting, reverse-sensing, plus sportier seats, and an optional $1,495 panoramic roof. The Titanium trim sits at the top of the range and starts at $40,030, adding premium features like a 10-speaker Bang & Olufsen sound system, wireless charging, and acoustic glass. It also boasts a 12.3-inch touchscreen, leather-trimmed seats, and the full range of driver assistance features plus park assist. Torque News writer Eric Way takes a the 2020 electric Chevy Volt. It is one of Chevy's last cars.

With its largish battery, you might wonder about the range of the plug-in Escape Hybrid? It’s a good question, and Ford has provided a bit of the answer. According to the Green Car Report, the plug-in Escape Hybrid will offer 30-plus miles of electric driving range. The Escape Plug-in Hybrid probably achieves it is by driving only the front wheels.

No All-Wheel-Drive For Escape Plug-In Hybrid

At present, all-wheel-drive isn’t available. The reason the Escape Plug-In Hybrid is offered only in two-wheel-drive is purely mechanical. Because of the size of the largish 14.4-kwh battery, there is no way to make the connection to the rear wheels.

Marc Stern has been an auto writer since 1971. It was a position that filled two boyhood dreams: One was that I would write, and two that I write about cars. When I took over as my newspaper’s auto editor, I began a 32-year career as an automotive columnist. There isn’t much on four wheels that I haven’t driven or reviewed. My work has appeared in Popular Mechanics, Mechanix Illustrated, AutoWeek, SuperStock, Trailer Life, Old Cars Weekly, Special Interest Autos, and others. Today, I am the Ford F150 reporter for Torque News. I write how-to and help columns for online sites such as Fixya.com and others. You can follow me on Twitter or Facebook.

Source: CarsDirect via Green Car Reports


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Comments

I'm not sure what you mean saying "Ford will introduce the manufacturer’s first-ever plug-in hybrid in the second quarter of 2020" because Ford released their CMax Energi plug-in hybrid crossover in 2012, and a few months later they came out with the Fusion Energi PHEV model (which is still being sold new now). They both shared a 7.6 kWh lithium-ion battery that powers the 88 kW (118 hp) electric motor. That battery was first rated at 20 miles of EV-only range, but later models extended that to 22 miles. In contrast, the Chevy Volt had a 18.kWh battery and was rated as providing 53 EV-only miles. The Honda Clarity PHEV has a 17kWh battery and is rated at 47 EV-only miles. A closer rival for the Escape PHEV CUV will be the Toyota RAV4 Prime, which has a 39 mile EV-only range. The RAV4 Prime will most likely cost more than the new Escape PHEV, but the Toyota will have AWD and get to 60MPH in 5.8 sec. In contrast the CMAX Energi managed 0-60 in 8.5 seconds. The only other PHEV crossover sold today is the Mitsubishi Outlander. It's 12kWh battery only manages 22miles EV-only range, and a 0-60 time of 9.6 sec. But the Outlander PHEV is really a 2012 design, so the new Escape PHEV will no doubt offer superior range and acceleration when compared to the Outlander, but less than the new, fast RAV4 Prime. I also do not understand this comment..."The reason the Escape Plug-In Hybrid is offered only in two-wheel-drive is purely mechanical. Because of the size of the largish 14.4-kwh battery, there is no way to make the connection to the rear wheels." Ford's 14.4kWh battery is on the smaller side for modern plug-in hybrids, and there is zero chance that Ford did not make design provisions for AWD and enough space for a small electric motor in back to drive the rear wheels. More likely is the fact that Ford will be working hard to up-sell EV fans who want more than just a basic economy car to the more profitable Mach-E line-up of BEVs. The good news is that the Escape PHEV should be priced close to it's rival's (non-plug-in) hybrids, once the EV incentives are added in to cut the overall price. And I cannot think of a reason why most people wouldn't prefer to get a plug-in hybrid over a non-plug-in hybrid version of the same vehicle for the same price.
Excellent post. Love the new PHEVs with large batteries. The more, the better. Want to use that energy for auxiliary purposes, too.
The CMAX is no longer part of the Ford lineup. The CMAX and the Fusion (sunsetting this year) are both cars. Ford is no longer in the car business. Therefore, the Escape Hybrid can be considered the first, now. 'Nuff said?
I find this to be an impressive offering. I own a Bolt. I chose a BEV for environmental reasons -- I wanted to be a part of the solution instead of a part of the problem. But, I must admit that I didn't investigate the environmental impact of the available choices. Recently, I have investigated this more. Published reports that account for full life-cycle CO2 emissions aren't too impressive for BEVs. They are better than ICEVs after 18 months of use, but much of this depends on the carbon intensity of the grid. In the Midwest, an ICEV with 35 mpg has lower life-cycle CO2 emission, whereas in the PNW an ICEV has a bread-even point of about 95 mpg. Extrapolating that to a PHEV, lets say one with 40 miles of EV range and a hybrid-gas efficiency of 39 mpg (like the upcoming RAV4 PHEV), the PHEV (used appropriately) would have an efective efficiency of about 400 mpg! And the life-cycle CO2 cost is far less than any BEV. If manufacturing vehicles and batteries can become carbon neutral, then a BEV would always be better. But for now and likely for a long time to come, a PHEV is environmentally the best choice. That is why I find the Escape PHEV to be very compelling.
After more reading and spreadsheet modelling, I find that most BEVs are better than PHEVs, but not by a lot, and only if the BEV battery doesn't get too big. But, a good PHEV will achieve 90% of the environmental benefits of a BEV while being much more flexible.
As a Bolt driver, I find being "green" i.e., a car not using gasoline, is extremely convenient and unless I go more than 250 miles. at once, I don't need my gas car. I have to say, though, the "grid" depends on where you are. While the grid here is slowly moving to non-fossil fuel, most EV/PHEV drivers in my neighborhood charge via the sun, free, with solar panels. Besides saving money and not using fossil fuels, I think one of the main benefits is not wasting 20 minutes in Costco's gas line each week too. I'd like to get the updated Bolt (now a 2022 model) but that is the last EV GM will use with lithium-ion batteries. GM and Toyota are moving to solid-state batteries...more range, quick charging, safe. As a recent review mentioned, Toyota is taking a step backward with the 2021 RAV 4 Prime as they already had a RAV 4 EV, which was really a compliance vehicle. At age 73, I may not be around in a few decades when I suspect we will be where China is now, subsidizing EV drivers with registration, licensing, and not penalize EV drivers like is happening in some states with extra EV taxes. But the good thing about these PHEVs....you can buy them and feel confident that in a few years you can resell them. With EVs I only lease as the changing technology and battery wear cause great depreciation. Good driving!
As a Bolt driver, I find being "green" i.e., a car not using gasoline, is extremely convenient and unless I go more than 250 miles. at once, I don't need my gas car. I have to say, though, the "grid" depends on where you are. While the grid here is slowly moving to non-fossil fuel, most EV/PHEV drivers in my neighborhood charge via the sun, free, with solar panels. Besides saving money and not using fossil fuels, I think one of the main benefits is not wasting 20 minutes in Costco's gas line each week too. I'd like to get the updated Bolt (now a 2022 model) but that is the last EV GM will use with lithium-ion batteries. GM and Toyota are moving to solid-state batteries...more range, quick charging, safe. As a recent review mentioned, Toyota is taking a step backward with the 2021 RAV 4 Prime as they already had a RAV 4 EV, which was really a compliance vehicle. At age 73, I may not be around in a few decades when I suspect we will be where China is now, subsidizing EV drivers with registration, licensing, and not penalize EV drivers like is happening in some states with extra EV taxes. But the good thing about these PHEVs....you can buy them and feel confident that in a few years you can resell them. With EVs I only lease as the changing technology and battery wear cause great depreciation. Good driving!