Why Going Turbo with a Hybrid is a Bad Idea
Timothy Boyer's picture

The Truth About Turbo Engine Reliability from This Car Shopping Expert

Is a turbocharged engine vehicle the right choice for you? Here’s a recent reveal from one automotive expert on the truths you need to understand about turbos and the vehicle examples where problems and issues have been evident and affected car reliability. Of particular note is a warning about why a turbo is a bad idea with Hybrid cars.
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Car Reliability

If there is one single-most factor all of us want from any car we buy it is that of car reliability. Sure, looks and comfort and the cool factor are pretty big too, however, if that car is spending more time and money sitting in a garage for repairs when it should be earning its keep...reliability becomes a big quality of life issue for the working man and woman.

Related article: Consumer Reports Says These 10 Vehicles Are the Least Reliable to Own

Related article: Everything You Need to Know About Toyota's New 4-Cylinder Turbo Engine

In a recent Car Help Center YouTube channel video we learn that there are some pluses and minuses that come with a turbo and why in some vehicle types and your driving habits should make a difference in whether or not you should go turbo with your next car.

The Win-Win of Turbocharged Engines

The primary reason for even the existence of a turbocharged engine is that it allows a smaller engine to be fitted inside a smaller car, but still have the power performance of a larger engine, but with the added fuel efficiency of a smaller car. It’s a win-win for both car manufacturers and their customers.

The Win-Lose of Turbocharged Engines

However, not everything benefits both parties equally. One example is that turbocharged engines have more parts and make an engine become less reliable. A good profitable thing for the automotive industry, but not so good for the owner of the car.

Related article: Toyota Tundra Warning About Its Engine Change

And it’s not just about money either that bites the owner, but the time lost. Turbocharged engine repair often involves a complicated and more-involved disassembly of the engine in order to get to the turbo units being worked on. The bigger the job is, the longer an owner will have to wait before his or her car is returned.

Issues with Turbocharged Engines

Ever since the inception of turbocharged engines there have been nearly countless reports of problems owners have had with their vehicles. Many of which still continue today.

According to the host of the video the primary cause of reliability issues with turbocharged engines can be traced to heat. Heat is an engine killer that shortens an engine’s life. However, oddly enough just the opposite is true when an engine runs too cold for a turbo to operate correctly,

In addition, there is also the driver factor---for example when the vehicle is used mostly for short distance driving to and from your daily destinations and/or when you live in a cold climate region. This especially true when it comes to a turbocharged Hybrid vehicles, which the host discusses in the video.

Vehicle Examples of Turbocharged Engine Problems

For a more in-depth discussion that provides some real-life examples of turbo issues in particular vehicles, here is a recent video posted by the Car Help Center YouTube channel where the host does a show and tell about the pluses and minuses of turbos that will help you with your buying decision on a new or used car with turbo.

Are Turbocharged Engines Reliable? The Truth About Turbo Engines

And finally…

For additional articles related to turbocharged vehicles, here are a few for your consideration:

Blown Turbo at Only 60,000 Miles on This Chevy. What Happened?

Guide for Choosing a Four-Cylinder Turbo Over a Typical Six-Cylinder and Vice Versa

COMING UP NEXT: Bad Husband Car Repair Projects

Timothy Boyer is a Torque News automotive reporter based in Cincinnati. Experienced with early car restorations, he regularly restores older vehicles with engine modifications for improved performance. Follow Tim on Twitter at @TimBoyerWrites for daily new and used vehicle news.

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