2021 Ford Mustang Mach-E
Jimmy Dinsmore's picture

What To Do If Your Mustang Mach-E Goes Into Deep Sleep Mode

Some early 2021 Mustang Mach-E vehicles have had issues with their 12-Volt battery getting discharged, resulting in what some owners have referred to as the “electric brick.” Ford has a solution for the Deep Sleep problem that exists on early Mustang Mach-E builds.
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The Detroit Free Press as well as members of the Mach-E Forum website recently reported a problem with some 2021 Ford Mustang Mach-E vehicles. The problem was dubbed the “electric brick.”

Ford has issued a Technical Service Bulletin and a statement regarding this issue that affects Mach-Es built on or before February 3.

Emma Bergg, who is a Ford spokesperson for the Mach-E, said: "We are aware that a small number of Mustang Mach-E owners have had their 12-volt battery reach a low-voltage condition. We proactively worked with early owners experiencing this issue to identify the root cause and a fix.”

I inquired with Bergg if more vehicles were being affected or if a full-blown recall might be coming. She said, “Vehicles coming out of the plant now are not affected and overall it’s a small number of affected customers.”

Mustang Mach-E OTA update

Earlier this year, there was a production hold on some Mustang Mach-E models over a software update. Some forum members of the Mach-E Forum noted that their new vehicles received their first over-the-air (OTA) updates.

The owners were unable to tell what was updated with this first OTA update. I asked Emma Bergg if that update was related to this battery issue and she said it was not related.

Ford Mustang Mach-E frunk

How To Deal With Battery Drain Issue In Mustang Mach-E
Here’s what Ford says is involved with the Technical Service Bulletin related to the battery drain issue.

Issue: Some 2021 Mustang Mach-E vehicles built on or before 3-Feb-2021 may exhibit the 12-volt battery becoming discharged while the vehicle is plugged in during the high voltage charging process. This may be due to the parameters in the powertrain control module (PCM). To correct the condition, follow the Service Procedure to reprogram various modules starting with the PCM.

Action: Follow the Service Procedure to correct the condition on vehicles that meet all of the following criteria:
• 2021 Mustang Mach-E
• Built on or before 3-Feb-2021
• 12-volt battery becomes discharged during high voltage battery charge

Warranty Status: Eligible under provisions of New Vehicle Limited Warranty (NVLW)/Emissions Warranty/Service Part Warranty (SPW)/Special Service Part (SSP)/Extended Service Plan (ESP) coverage. Limits/policies/prior approvals are not altered by a TSB. NVLW/Emissions Warranty/SPW/SSP/ESP coverage limits are determined by the identified causal part and verified using the OASIS part coverage tool.

This issue cannot be fixed at home and must be handled through an authorized Ford professional technician, through a warranty. For full details on the Technical Service Bulletin, click here.

Mustang Mach E and Tesla Model Y

Final Thoughts
While the Detroit Free Press did their due diligence in covering this story, this is a minor glitch. These things do happen on first-time vehicles, and is especially true on vehicles as technologically new as the Mach-E.

This likely won’t affect the long-term success of the Mach-E unless this problem persists further or if Ford has to issue a full-blown recall. That could be a huge problem, as Ford aims to battle Tesla with their Model Y competitor. Just yesterday I wrote about how Motor Trend proclaimed the Tesla Model Y to be slightly better than the Mach-E. Minor issues like this can become more pesky should they persist. I don’t believe they will and I trust Ford on their word that it is limited to very early production versions only.

For more thoughts on the Mustang Mach-E please check out my full review here, and also read my thoughts on the one-pedal driving mode.

Leave me your thoughts on this issue in the comments below.

Jimmy Dinsmore has been an automotive journalist for more than a decade and been a writer since the high school. His Driver’s Side column features new car reviews and runs in several newspapers throughout the country. He is also co-author of the book “Mustang by Design” and “Ford Trucks: A Unique Look at the Technical History of America’s Most Popular Truck”. Also, Jimmy works in the social media marketing world for a Canadian automotive training aid manufacturing company. Follow Jimmy on Facebook, Twitter, at his special Ford F-150 coverage on Twitter and LinkedIn. You can read the most of Jimmy's stories by searching Torque News Ford for daily Ford vehicle report.


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Comments

A Ford with electrical problems. Geeeee! I wonder how THAT happened?