Is ResistAll Worth the $2,000 Add-On for Your 2022 Toyota Tundra
Harutiun Hareyan's picture

Is ResistAll Worth the $2,000 Add-On for Your 2022 Toyota Tundra?

Some owners are saying that dealers are not reasonably pricing ResistAll and Nitrogen add-ons for after-purchase options for the 2022 Toyota Tundra.
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Before 2020, dealers would sell you a car for MSRP or lower, but their main haggle was getting you to buy expensive floor mats, expensive window tints, expensive seat covers, tire air, and cannot forge the overpriced ozone cleaning. Notice how all of those add-ons had the word “expensive” in front of them. That’s because they were. You were greeted with smiles saying, “bud, you’re going to need this here nitrogen for your tires, so it’ll run better.” After the pandemic, dealers started to upsell the entire car itself!

For those who don’t know, ResistAll is a chemical that a dealer can add to the seats and paint of your car to protect it against things that would ruin the paint. Sun, sweat, and hairspray all diminish the color of your leather seats. They also do the same on your car’s paint. ResistAll also makes it shine a little better. I personally wouldn’t add it solely because it is rumored to get rid of the new car smell.

Is ResistAll Worth the $2,000 Add-On for Your 2022 Toyota Tundra

Sold by MBPI, ResistAll is one of those chemicals that you know isn’t really good for you, yet you still get it anyway. Kind of like dollar store deodorant…smells good but I wouldn’t put it on. ResistAll is not a very expensive product. You can buy the care package off eBay for $30-40. There are also many other vehicle paint and seat chemicals for far cheaper.

Dannay Phan posted a picture of his receipt with all the add-ons he got and one of them was the ResistAll coating priced at $1822 on Facebook’s 2022+ Toyota Tundra Owners group. Now for the record, he did say that the dealer put 3 layers of ResistAll on the car so that’s probably the reason why it’s so expensive but even for accounting labor, 3 coats of a $40 chemical shouldn’t cost $2000.

In the group, he posted, “Can anyone let me know what kind of chemical is resist all that they put on the exterior and interior?” According to Enginediray.com, “it contains benzene, toluene, xylene and ethylbenzene, and other harmful chemicals.” Ironically, this is the same stuff that they also put in your interior.

Like I said earlier, there are many cheaper alternatives to ResistAll and many safer ones too. I don’t really know why they put this stuff in the interior, but I can assure you unless you want a $2000 dollar add-on to your cost, this isn’t the stuff for you.

If by chance you come across a 2022 Toyota Tundra that is selling for MSRP, don’t get any other add-ons. Especially anything chemical-related. Most of those chemicals are sold to dealers in bulk but they price it so high that it’s almost like a “special treatment.” Go to a good detailer and ask for a protective coating. They’ll do it way cheaper. Or you can use your negotiating skills and try to add any free stuff.

Aaron Oliver said, “We got ResistAll, and weather tech floor mats all three rows on my wife’s SUV for $1200.” So, is it really worth it? Not. If you are going to add on some cool mods to your truck, I’m sure you have the capability to do minor chemical details that won’t cost you an airline ticket. However, if you don’t want to do any DIY stuff, take it to your local detailer. They’ll charge you but it won’t break your bank.

What do you think? Would you get ResistAll? Let us know in the comments below.

Harutiun Hareyan is reporting Toyota news at Torque News. His automotive interests and vast experience test-riding new cars give his stories a sense of authenticity and unique insights. Follow Harutiun on Twitter at @HareyanHarutiun for daily Toyota news.


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Comments

Was a finance manager. It is like 300-400 cost to dealer for resist all. By any name it I should all the same stuff. We called it Mop and Glow. Each finance manager can sell it for however amount they wish over the coat to dealer. The customer is paying for the treatment and the warranty on the treated item.
Keep in mind that although the chemicals are inexpensive, the price includes the labor for applying. People don't work for free. This article should make note of the labor and time needed to apply, especially if it takes 3 coats on the interior and exterior. That's probably around a half to full days work. Dealerships have overhead. Of course the consumer if more than able to purchase from eBay and apply themselves, however most dealers have someone that has attended a class in the detail department for proper application of these chemicals.
HI Adam. I understand what you are saying. If I had a nice expensive sports car, I would get it done by a professional. However the demographic of affordable Toyota drivers is just not the right one to get it professionally coated. Although I'm sure a lot of new owners probably buy it anyway.