2003 Honda Insight 2 seater hybrid
Peter Neilson's picture

Hybrid Cars Are Proving Their Worth With Surging Fuel Prices

Hybrid cars are often a joke until they prove their worth. Take a look at prices, expected MPG and other things you can expect if you are wanting to get into a hybrid car.
Advertisement

Hybrid cars like the Toyota Prius have been at the tail end of jokes for decades now. Those jokes continue to happen until people have to fill up their fuel tanks.

Surging fuel prices quickly impact people's pocketbooks, and the consequence ends up being hybrids are no longer a joke. Unfortunately, however, the stigma cars like the Toyota Prius are selling like water a rock concert.

I want to cover taking a look at how hybrids are proving their worth, and if you are looking at getting a used one, what to know.

Hybrid Cars Proving Their Worth
Hybrid cars come in a variety of flavors. Toyota has the largest selection of hybrid vehicles by far, but there are many options out there. Hyundai, Honda, Ford, and a few others have rolled the dice to play the game.

2020 Hyundai Ioniq

Each of these companies is doing well with their technology, and people are lining up to buy.

However, while initially were supposed to be a "bridge" technology into our future (now), hybrid cars are serving what I see as a different purpose.

People are flocking to hybrids as the gas crisis keeps people from driving larger vehicles. But, Covid or not, people want to get out and travel. Being couped up has caused some serious cabin fever for many, and now the travel bug is pushing people to get out and go.

Unfortunately, the pandemic has put a significant dent in savings or income streams for some families. In addition, the cost to take the SUV or large vehicle on a road trip can hinder the fun because of the added cost of fuel.

Hybrids offer a fuel-saving option that takes away the sting of the fuel pump—giving families more money in their pocket to spend on things they want to is empowering. That freedom to choose is a lifesaver.

Looking For A Used Hybrid? Look For These Things
A used hybrid can be a risky move. Hybrid batteries are typically the biggest fear that many have when looking to buy.

Let me tell you a secret, though. If the hybrid you are looking at is less than ten years old, do not sweat it. Most hybrid batteries last 10 to 15 years if driven regularly.

Ford Fusion Hybrid Black

NiMH batteries are very robust and will last if they are exercised continually. Focus on the service history and if there are any leaks. Most hybrid cars are very well put together, and problems should be minimal.

Conclusion
I adore my Prius. It may carry a stigma, but I do not care. I get over 50 miles to the gallon, which is something to write home about.

Hybrids are, in my mind, are still a bridge technology as we continue to advance, but they still have good value. Unfortunately, hybrids are at a premium because of the fuel prices; keep that in mind while looking.

That is all for today. Remember Today's Adventure is Tomorrow's Story. Happy to help anyone looking for some information on buying a hybrid.

A/C not feeling chilly? This could be the cause.

Check out this wild new battery tech that Tesla has and why it will forever change the auto industry.

Also, watch Toyota suddenly bringing its BZ4X electric SUV concept to United States on Torque News Youtube channel and please subscribe us on Youtube and follow on Twitter for daily Toyota and EV news reports.

Peter Neilson is an automotive consultant specializing in electric cars and hybrid battery technologies. He holds a Bachelor of Science in Automotive Service Technology from Weber State University. Peter can be reached on Linkedin and you can tweet him at The_hybrid_guy on Twitter. Find his page on Facebook at Certified Auto Consulting. Read more of Peter's stories at Toyota news coverage on Torque News. Search Toyota Prius Torque News for more in depth Prius coverage from our reporter.


Subscribe to Torque News on YouTube.


Follow Torque News on YouTube, Twitter and Facebook.

Comments

Really? Then I shouldn't be forced to help mostly well-off folks buy them (subsidies).