SAE International website features the 2012 SAE World Congress this week

2012 SAE World Congress engages the automotive world this week

Multiple engineering events start today in Detroit and center on high efficiency engines, electric motors, and culminate with the SAE 2012 World Congress and Exhibition at Cobo Center in Detroit.

While the SAE International website features the 2012 SAE World Congress this week, TorqueNews writers will be engaged as well, especially at the Exhibition at Detroit's Cobo Center. Why? Anything and everything that pertains to automotive and transportation technologies will be on hand.

In particular, the SAE 2012 High Efficiency IC Engines Symposium which actually starts today at the Westin Book Cadillac Hotel next to Cobo Center combines technology presentations with networking opportunities for professionals associated with technologies impacting fuel efficiency. The technical program includes an overview of the regulatory outlook followed by discussion of technologies such as advanced and partially premixed combustion, cooled EGR boosting, ignition and direct injection technologies, pressure boosting, intelligent combustion, thermal efficiency including waste heat recovery, fully variable valvetrains, and other new and developing technologies.

This year's program also will include a new session on future fluids and fuels for high efficiency engines. Participants will include automotive and light-, medium- and heavy-duty OEMs, suppliers, and academia.

Next is the SAE 2012 Powertrain Electric Motors Symposium for Electric and Hybrid Vehicles, also at the Westin Book Cadillac. Meet and mingle with technology leaders by attending the Electric Motors event. Unlike other events, this Symposium puts great emphasis on the electric motor, and will give a comprehensive overview on the latest global innovations in the vehicle powertrain electric traction motor industry. It will give insight on how fast the major players are moving and how this affects the world marketplace. This Symposium will also give an overview on new developing supply chains.

The program will address market growth projections, requirements, and cost structures for three varieties of electric traction motors: permanent magnet motors, induction motors, and switch reluctance motors. This year's symposium will feature expanded coverage of rare earth metals, and, for the first time, presentations on testing and simulation.

By offering the latest insights, knowledge and visions, the Powertrain Electric Motor Symposium will enable decision makers to make a more well-balanced consideration on investment opportunities and risks.

Finally, the main event, the 2012 SAE World Congress and Exhibition. The theme this year is, “Get Connected,” and represents the new and diverse connections that will drive significant advancements in the auto industry of tomorrow. Not only does the theme symbolize literal connections, such as those between vehicles, infrastructure, the Internet, and the nation's electrical grid, but also demonstrates the most fundamental of connections; the connections and relationships between engineers who are developing the next generation vehicle technology.

TorqueNews Special Coverage

Since this reporter focuses on auto technology, I will be especially engaged with any and all new news on the split-cycle engine technology. In particular I will interview Scuderi Engine and Tour Engine. I will also connect with Pinnacle Engine and the Copper Alliance as well, since I have been invited by both.

In addition, I will survey the floor and Tweet my comments from time to time via @AuthorFrankS and @torquenewsauto. Then I will record as much video as much as my memory stick will allow. So, look forward to multiple reports on technology that will very soon change your world.

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Comments

Frank, when you interview the Scuderi Group, please keep in mind that the topic first and foremost in the invetor's mind is, "What happened to the ipo and signings the were supposed to happen last year?" What is the timetable for the ipo? Has there been a signing? What happened in the meetings with Daimler last summer? Another good question is, "Have you failed your invetors?" Thanks.
Sure will, Brian. I have to admit, though, that I was not aware of any IPO. Up to last year's SAE, there was no mention of it. I was told Scuderi was going to remain private. Hmmm. Now you have me rethinking my approach. Perhaps that's why things have been quiet from them over the past 6 months. I do know that they were very quiet on releasing any OEM evaluations, too. I did get one clear message, though: 65 MPG was feasible using their split cycle engine. Thanks for writing and bringing this to my attention.
Frank, Do not be a pawn for a small time disillusioned investor, what most investors would like to know is how the Scuderi Technology is being received at the show? What are the expert opinions on the technology?
Anonymous, I am invested in the company with about ( 20 - no joke - 20) friends and acquaintances. We discuss it often and although we're all small time ($5k to about $80k), we're most interested in the progress of our investment. We did not donate the money, we invested it. Hearing about new patent applications is all well and good, but I don't think patent number 301 is the magic patent that will lead to the technology hitting the market. Just my opinion. Sorry.
I met with Scuderi today, speaking with Nick Scuderi as well as Bill Wrinn, director of Marketing. Regarding IPO rumors, that is not even hinted by anyone at Scuderi for obvious reasons. The SEC would have a fit; and rightfully so. So take that off the table. Fact is, Scuderi is a privately held company and will remain so for now. That does not mean it could never happen, but it would have to be an official statement so that the SEC would be OK with it. Regarding patent app spending, be happy they are enaging that. Fact is, Scuderi is NOT an engine manufacturer. Their business model is based on intellectual property; meaning, that is their only product. So any expense to support, protect and develop new pieces of that property is a wise move from what I can see. I share you impatience, though. All investors experience that, especially when you are a passive investor. Hedge fund managers experience this kind of outside pressure as well. My take is, the auto industry has come a long way accepting the split cycle approach, but they are still rationing funds toward its development. Obviously not everyone is getting it, and are getting stuck into an electrification paradigm. Unfortunately, the cost is killing all of us.. Scuderi at least has OEM interest popping up around the world; and those sources must be protected due to confidentiality agreements. Nonetheless, Scuderi is still developing, and will continue. I would like to see an engine inside a vehicle, too. I think it would be in their own best interest, but their business model seems to imply otherwise; in other words, they prefer to find an OEM, then work with them on the development. One thing for sure, the tech is alive, well, growing in stature. Hope this answer helps for the time being. Your investment horizon has to remain long term, but be apprised that the horizon has gone from 8-10 years in 2010 to possibly 3-5 years as of this year. So, the timeline is shortening. I interviewed Hugo and Oded Tour of Tour Engine, and will have a report on their take as well. Perhaps we will see a split cycle as a generator engine for range extending before anything else. That's just a personal opinion, but not out of probability.
Thank you very much. I'm please and disappointed to get this information. In my opinion, most of us who have attended the investment meetings and received the updates felt something was to happen (as far as a signing) by the end of 2011. I also recall being led to believe that the IPO process would begin once the first signing materialized. Some people on other boards, who claimed inside knowledge, made repeated claims of particularly specific signing timelines. It's clear they were either lying or were misled. At any rate, a 3-5 year timeline, in my opinion, is different from what I was led to believe. But hey, that's ok. Now I know, and I appreciate you asking what must have been some very difficult questions.
Just to be sure I do not misrepresent here, that 3-5 years is MY total outlook based on what I understood the situation was leaning. The hard 3 year figure, though, would likely be a minimum for ANY OEM to get a new engine in place for high-volume production; but that was a number I did hear and one that Scuderi would agree. Keep in mind, though, the 3 year clock does not count until the ink is dry on a bonafide contract. So your guess is as good as mine on that part. That's why I added the additional 2 years making it a 3-5 outlook; in other words, in an absolute sense. If the engine was used for a generator engine, that could fly first, in my opinion. For the record, I have no reason to doubt that 3 year min timeline. Fact is, any OEM would need time to design, package, test, validate, redesign, tweak, meet EPA for certification, etc. Certifying a new engine is not a walk in the park.

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