Toyota Prius C

Consumer Reports doubles down, says Toyota Prius C 'isn't a good car'

Just when we thought it was over, Consumer Reports is defending their review and is not biting their tongue.

Consumer Reports review of the all-new Toyota Prius C generated quite a stir when it hit the web late last month. The review, which called the vehicle “lackluster” and “cheap,” was praised by some and dismissed by others, including Cars.com. Considered one of the leading destinations for online car shoppers, Cars.com defended the Prius C for its overall value and impressive features. Now, when it seemed the dust was beginning to settle, Consumer Reports has decided to double down on its accusations in a new article.

The site’s new piece titled “The Toyota Prius C isn't a good car, and here's why,” continues the barrage against the new EV and does not mince words. Consumer Reports argues that supporters of the Prius C are simply “missing the point.” Although the car’s defenders point out great fuel economy, Consumer Reports claims solid mpg was not enough to merit a positive review.

According to Consumer Reports, the Prius C exhibited poor comprehensive test scores, which means that the vehicle cannot earn Consumer Report’s recommendation. In order to avoid appearing biased against Toyota, Consumer Reports indicates that Prius liftback and Prius V both received solid scores and recommendations.

While some supporters of the Toyota Prius C cited its gas mileage as a major selling point, others favored its seemingly affordable sticker price. Consumer Reports original video review of the Prius C stated, "If you want a $20,000 Prius, you should buy a used one." Even though this line received great criticism, Consumer Reports is standing by it.

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Although $20,000 may be a reasonable price, Consumer Reports argues that its job is to judge the Prius C’s value in terms of its competitors. “Compared with other models you can buy, the Prius C proves to be really disappointing,” said Consumer Reports. The site went on to say, “It's a cheap car with an expensive drivetrain. We can't be any more clear than that.”

As if those words weren’t damaging enough, Consumer Reports’ latest article claims that none of its test drivers have wanted to drive the Prius C since its initial test run. And why doesn’t the Consumer Reports crew want to drive the vehicle? First off, it “feels like a penalty box” compared to other subcompacts. Furthermore, competitors like the Chevrolet Sonic and Hyundai Accent “feel like driving a Mercedes” compared to the Prius C, according to Consumer Reports.

What do you think of Consumer Reports’ new article? Did Consumer Reports need to defend their position or is it overkill?

Also read: Consumer Reports calls the Toyota Prius C "lackluster" and "cheap"
Also read: Cars.com defends Toyota Prius C, takes issue with Consumer Reports

Comments

wow,, I trust Consumer Reports. I was interested in a C but now I probably would look at a Hyundai Accent first.
The defensive and sarcastic comments in the Consumer Reports follow-up do them no credit, particularly this absurd statement: "Our Chevrolet Sonic and Hyundai Accent both feel like driving a Mercedes compared to the more expensive Prius C..." I expect far more professionalism from Consumer Reports, and will tell them so when it's time to renew my subscription.
Test drove several compacts, including Toyota products. TOO MUCH PLASTIC and most are just above a toy. Cheap, and I mean cheap features and materials. I have the means and wanted to buy a fuel efficient car to do my part for the planet. I ended up getting a Focus. Of all the models it just fit. Plus I wanted to buy from an American company that keeps profits in the US. Not a company that supports a country that still hunts WHALES for RESEARCH! Yes, RESEARCH! Oh by the way, let's eat them to offset the costs to save the whales.
Are you kidding? I'm so sick of this whale wars bullshit. First of all, look at what we do to cows, chickens and pigs in the United States. We grow grain, destroy our soil and mono-crop just to feed animals so we can eat meat. While millions starve around the world. Not to mention zoos. And the fact that with the pharmaceutical industry, we might as well openly admit to using our own people for research. Also, Japan is an island and a relatively small one at that. They have been hunting dolphins and whales for as long as they were able because the ocean is their primary food source. Who are we to say that a whales life has more value than the animals we here in the United States breed only to be caged their whole life and slaughtered for food. That's some serious Free Willy/Flipper bull shit. You really need to get a grip on cultural relativity. I am certain the United States has more moral and ethical shame on their hands than most countries. And you don't see Japan attacking us for our meat industry and animal slaughtering ways because they got emotional when they watched Chicken Little. I realize this is a car site but the whole whale wars thing is retarded. Lets look at our own flaws before pointing fingers at every other nation. Furthermore, who the fuck knows where your American car is being built. At least when you buy from a Japanese company you know it was made in Japan. Also, I'm not vegetarian, I have never been to Japan, don't have any obsession with Japan and im 100% Caucasian American mutt. I'm just sick of people attacking Japan or other countries when we should be focusing on the horrors of our own countries treatment of BOTH animals and people. Just because you watched Free Willy as a kid doesn't make Japan evil for hunting whales - a direct result of their geographic location and now an integral part of their culture. But Americans know nothing about culture seeing as we have no solidified culture in this country so we don't think twice before we shit on everyone else. Seizing an opportunity even in a car forum. Pathetic.
I don't care what Consumer Reports says. I learned a long time ago to think for myself, and gather my own factual information. I own a Prius C and frankly Consumer Reports is incorrect. Here is my real world experience, not an opinion. I routinely get gas mileage better than the EPA estimates. I average 56 MPG overall, where the EPA predicts an overall (Combined City/Hwy) MPG of 50. The car is peppy enough to enter the freeway with no difficulty and it handles very well for a small car at this price point. My driving experience with the Prius C includes 2 long highway trips exceeding 1,000 miles each and I found the car to be extremely comfortable and very thrifty on the gas. Frankly I don't care if it has a lot of plastic, every car made these days does. What I do care about is the reason I bought it; getting the best possible gas mileage, and getting it in a car that will hold its value. Yes, I could buy a Yaris or a Focus for less money, but they won't give me the gas mileage I get with my Prius C and they will lose their value far faster than my Prius C will. And that brings up a very important point that everyone seems to be missing. The time to payback because of the slightly higher cost for the Prius C compared to a Yaris or a Focus is more than made up by the fact that I can drive my Prius C for 20,000 miles this year and still get 17K or better when I sell it next year. A Yaris or Focus with 20,000 miles won't bring me more than 8 grand next year. Will I buy another Prius C? ABSOLUTELY!
Happy with my Prius C. Averaging 55 mpg and dont have a problem with how it handles. Not sure how it will handle in the snow but took that into consideration when I bought it.
"Frankly I don't care if it has a lot of plastic, every car made these days does" WRONG. And that's why CR rightfully criticized it.
Harpooning the Prius C is not the only recent report leading me to doubt the veracity of Consumer Reports.
I too own a Prius C, and I think CU's review is somewhat correct. The Prius C is a cheap car with an expensive drive train. But that's why I bought it, to get the best drive train I could get at that price. And frankly I don't mind the plastic (what are we supposed to get at that price, leather? wood?). But what occurs to me is the in recent years Consumer Reports seems to have lost their way. They seem to emphasize handling, acceleration and braking, encouraging drivers to think of themselves as Dale Earnhardt or something. Yeah the CVT in the Prius C means stamping on the accelerator gets me a roar and little else, but that just means I don't take stupid risks and try to cut people off. Instead I drive more slowly than I ever did and get 50 mpg. Why can't that be a worthy goal.
I just purchased the Prius C the other day and have no regrets. The people at Consumer reports needs to take a step off that pedestal. The car was very affordable, had more amazing standard features than any other hybrid in the price range, and I thought it drove better than the full size Prius. I took it for a two minute test drive and An hour later the car was all mine; and i have not had a single regret since. Everyone raves about how nice my car is; even with the plastic. I don't think I will trust consumer reports after this. Who are they to say what we should and should not buy. I say try something for yourself instead of listening to what others say. Obviously consumer reports is out of touch.
I just purchased the Prius C the other day and have no regrets. The people at Consumer reports needs to take a step off that pedestal. The car was very affordable, had more amazing standard features than any other hybrid in the price range, and I thought it drove better than the full size Prius. I took it for a two minute test drive and An hour later the car was all mine; and i have not had a single regret since. Everyone raves about how nice my car is; even with the plastic. I don't think I will trust consumer reports after this. Who are they to say what we should and should not buy. I say try something for yourself instead of listening to what others say. Obviously consumer reports is out of touch.
I have always thought that Consumer Reports was the most objective source for product ratings. From what I understand, they make their money through subscriptions and donations only. I took a look at the Prius C myself when it hit the market. I don't entirely disagree with their assessment. It looks cheap inside and isn't very dynamic to drive. Consumer Reports and others all use weighted average tables to rate each automobile. If you read the details, you will find the categories they use. I'm of the opinion that reliability is still one of the most importate factors in determining a purchase. I weight it higher than I do interior/technology for example. I mean, the technology doesn't mean that much if the car's always in the shop. Value is another important factor (but how do I objectively evaluate value?). Check Cosumer Reports for reliability data and prepare your own weighted average table before your next purchase. I expect the Prius C to be very reliable and fuel efficient. Is it a great value though? It won't be as dynamic as a Mazda 2 to drive or have as many features and comforts as a Hyundai or Kia for a similar price. However, I do expect the Prius to be more reliable than a Ford Fiesta or a Chevrolet Sonic. Write back if you would like an example of how to prepare your own weighted average table. I hope this was helpful.
Consumer Reports is a joke. They've been highly negative of Apple, a technology company that is literally changing the way the entire world views and uses computers, and now a Prius C, the first affordable hybrid from one of the most reliable car manufacturers on the planet. The Prius C isn't a race car, nor is it a luxury car, and it's not designed to be. It's designed to get phenomenal gas milage, and it does. The car is filled with all the technology a tech-obsessed person like me could ever want, wirelessly integrates with my iPhone effortlessly, and guides me through new cities with ease. I can park in small spots, turn on a dime, and there's never power lacking when I need to zip on the freeway. I drove a Ford Fiesta prior to buying the Prius C, and the dashboard design and interior felt like a clusterfuck compared to the C.
Consumer Reports is a joke. They've been highly negative of Apple, a technology company that is literally changing the way the entire world views and uses computers, and now a Prius C, the first affordable hybrid from one of the most reliable car manufacturers on the planet. The Prius C isn't a race car, nor is it a luxury car, and it's not designed to be. It's designed to get phenomenal gas milage, and it does. The car is filled with all the technology a tech-obsessed person like me could ever want, wirelessly integrates with my iPhone effortlessly, and guides me through new cities with ease. I can park in small spots, turn on a dime, and there's never power lacking when I need to zip on the freeway. I drove a Ford Fiesta prior to buying the Prius C, and the dashboard design and interior felt like a clusterfuck compared to the C.
Consumer Reports is a joke. They've been highly negative of Apple, a technology company that is literally changing the way the entire world views and uses computers, and now a Prius C, the first affordable hybrid from one of the most reliable car manufacturers on the planet. The Prius C isn't a race car, nor is it a luxury car, and it's not designed to be. It's designed to get phenomenal gas milage, and it does. The car is filled with all the technology a tech-obsessed person like me could ever want, wirelessly integrates with my iPhone effortlessly, and guides me through new cities with ease. I can park in small spots, turn on a dime, and there's never power lacking when I need to zip on the freeway. I drove a Ford Fiesta prior to buying the Prius C, and the dashboard design and interior felt like a clusterfuck compared to the C.
Consumer Reports is a joke. They've been highly negative of Apple, a technology company that is literally changing the way the entire world views and uses computers, and now a Prius C, the first affordable hybrid from one of the most reliable car manufacturers on the planet. The Prius C isn't a race car, nor is it a luxury car, and it's not designed to be. It's designed to get phenomenal gas milage, and it does. The car is filled with all the technology a tech-obsessed person like me could ever want, wirelessly integrates with my iPhone effortlessly, and guides me through new cities with ease. I can park in small spots, turn on a dime, and there's never power lacking when I need to zip on the freeway. I drove a Ford Fiesta prior to buying the Prius C, and the dashboard design and interior felt like a clusterfuck compared to the C.
Ok if Consumer Reports is a joke. Give me a reliable, objective source for product information. JD Power and Associates only tests initial quality. The reliability data is provided by a pool of responders not by Consumer Reports. I agree that everyone has their opinion. Assuming they had enough respondents, the reliability data they provide should be untainted by opinion. I don't always agree with them. That's why I test and evaluate the products on my own. It's still good to consider what they write. But I'm never trading in my Iphone for a Samsung! However, I will trade in my Iphone 4S for an Iphone 5. :)
After reading this. I do not trust ANY MORE CR.