General Motors

Good News: The US Government Might Only Lose $10 Billion on GM Bailout Loans

Reports have surfaced that indicate that the US Department of Treasury expects to sell off the remaining portion of General Motors stock by the end of this year and with the current price of GM stock sitting roughly $4 per share above the issue price, the government will technically make money on the sale of these finals shares.

Both General Motors and the US Government have faced more than their share of criticism after the automaker “paid off” the massive $49.5 billion government loan issued in 2009 with stock. The idea was that the government could hold onto said stock for a while and then sell it at a profit, thus making money on the bailout loans rather than just breaking even on a straight repayment. It probably seemed like a good idea at first but with the price of that stock dropping well below the $33 IPO pricing in the years following, the government ended up losing a substantial amount of money when they began selling off the GM stock. Things improved slightly as the government sold off stock and prices rose but the losses felt through the earlier sale of GM stock made it pretty much impossible for the government to break even – let alone turn a profit.

Through the sale of GM stock to date, the US Government has effectively recovered $38.4 billion of the original $49.5 billion awarded to the automaker and each time the Feds have either sold GM stock or announced plans to sell more GM stock, the value of GM stock has risen. Because of this, the shares sold more recently have come at a price higher than the $33 issue price which means that, technically, the government made money on those shares and they will continue to do so as they sell off their final portion of the automaker. Unfortunately with a price nearing $38 per share, the remaining stock is only worth about $1.2 billion so barring some unprecedented jump in GM stock pricing, the taxpayers are likely to lose about $10 billion through the government loans accepted by General Motors.

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Comments

Good perspective. The counterpoint would be that had GM failed Ford, Toyota, and the other automakers might have added share, hired workers, sent orders to the suppliers GM used to use and the economy might have recovered. Might being the important word.
Wow, I wish I could afford to lose "only" $10 billion.
Who is left with controlling shares then? The UAW?

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