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How a 50 mph dedicated EV lane system could solve to cost-per-range issue with EVs

At 50 mph, the Mitsubishi i-Miev can go 70 miles on a charge, the Nissan Leaf 97 miles, and the Model S 300 miles.

Compare this to what those cars can do at a typical 70 mph speed: 260 miles range for the Model S, 68 miles for the Leaf, and 40 miles for the I-Miev. That's about a 15% range gain for the Model S, a 63% range gain for the Leaf, and a whopping 75% range difference for the I-Miev. The Tesla Model S's being a heavy and aerodynamic car factors into its inefficient low speed range and more efficient, relative to that, high-speed range.

Nissan's Smart Strategy Regarding LEAF Inventory is Not a Crisis

Nissan Motor Acceptance Corporation (NMAC), which is an independent subsidiary of Nissan Motor Corporation (NMC), is responsible for customer leasing programs and in effect buys new cars from the parent company and then leases them to retail and fleet customers. As with any organization that buys and leases assets, part of the process is that at the end of the lease period they must liquidate that asset. In order to liquidate the asset, in this case a LEAF coming off of lease, they must decide on what the value, or residual, of the asset will be at that point in time.

A predictive methodology for benchmarking car sales as a function of MSRP

This trend can be used to benchmark a car model vs its competitors within the same price range. There will always be outliers, but in general this trend works as a benchmark. As an example, if the MSRP of a car is 15 K and it sells 1,000 cars that is a failure. If it sells 500,000 cars, the car would be is a resounding success.

There are always qualifiers which have to be taken into consideration, these are either limited production, supply constrained, some other economic mechanism, or new model year/change in style mechanism at play.

Three Reasons I Prefer Nissan LEAF over Kia Soul EV

He writes that he really likes the Soul and on paper he feels that it's a better car than Nissan LEAF and many respects. "But I chose the LEAF because of the following" reasons, he writes, and lists three reasons for his choice.

The first reason is the lack of nearby Kia dealers. It will take him to drive 45 minutes to get to the nearest Kia dealer that actually stocks Soul EV. This is, of course, closely related to the second and particularly the third reasons, discussed below.

How to tell when electric cars have made it, and why we don’t need a cheap one

Is the future electric? Are electric vehicles destined to displace the internal combustion engine for passenger vehicles once and for all? If so, how long is that going to take? And why does an all-electric Nissan LEAF cost $30,000 when it looks just like a Nissan Versa you can get for a shade under $12,000 if the dealer is desperate?

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