GM

A predictive methodology for benchmarking car sales as a function of MSRP

This trend can be used to benchmark a car model vs its competitors within the same price range. There will always be outliers, but in general this trend works as a benchmark. As an example, if the MSRP of a car is 15 K and it sells 1,000 cars that is a failure. If it sells 500,000 cars, the car would be is a resounding success.

There are always qualifiers which have to be taken into consideration, these are either limited production, supply constrained, some other economic mechanism, or new model year/change in style mechanism at play.

Two Reasons It's a Bad Idea for GM to use Tesla Superchargers

The Chevy Bolt is a smaller car with presumably a smaller battery. Pumping that current is not a good idea; Tesla gets away with because of battery size. Sure the Bolt could be designed to throttle back the charge, but then you lose some advantage to the quick charge.

Second issue is battery chemistry. Not all lithium batteries are created equal and they. Tesla uses NCA. The Bolt, if the whispers are to be believed, is supposed to use NCM.
From what I've read NCM degrades faster than NCA.

Why GM Should be Applauded for The Chevrolet Bolt and What Should It Do for Success

No other automaker besides Tesla has jumped in to announce a 200 mile BEV. Ford and Chrysler had been non-committal, Toyota and Honda are going hydrogen, and the Europeans believe more on PHEVs, though BMW and Audi may have "concepts" for the future. Even the current BEV market leader, Nissan, hasn't announced anything about its next-generation LEAF or if it will incorporate a 200 mile battery.

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