The most affordable EV in America: Mitsubishi i-MiEV arrives this spring

The most affordable EV in America: Mitsubishi i-MiEV arrives this spring

The 2014 Mitsubishi i-MiEV is the most affordable electric vehicle in America. It arrives here in the U.S. this spring.

The 2014 Mitsubishi i-MiEV isn’t just about saving the planet, it’s also about saving buyers dollars. The 2014 Mitsubishi i-MiEV arrives this spring here in the U.S. and it’s the most affordable electric vehicle in America. The i-MiEV isn’t new, as more than 30,000 Mitsubishi i-MiEV and i-MiEV-based production vehicles have been sold around the globe in markets like the U.S., Europe and Asia. What’s the cost of the i-MiEV?

The 2014 Mitsubishi i-MiEV ES model that includes a DC quick charge port, battery warming system and heated side view mirrors starts at $22,995 (plus $850 destination) which is a $6,130 price reduction from the previous generation. And after factoring in the Federal tax credit of $7,500, the net MSRP of the 2014 Mitsubishi i-MiEV drops to $15,495 (if taxpayers incur federal tax liability.)

Residents in California can obtain the new 2014 Mitsubishi i-MiEV as low as $12,995 after factoring in the available EV federal tax credit of $7,500 and the California state EV financial incentive of up to $2,500 (if residents are eligible.)

One of the questions that most people will ask is, "How long will the battery last?" Mitsubishi says they have made considerable strides in battery technology over the years and as a result, Mitsubishi backs their lithium-ion main drive battery pack with a transferable 8-year/100,000-mile limited warranty.

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Comments

Looks like a winner to me... Good looking, affordable and cost effective as to stated battery life. However, the range is a bit inhibiting for some. Perfect intercity commuter, taskmaster.
Sounds like a really sweet price. No mention of a battery cooling system.
The i-Miev has always come with a battery cooling system I assume the new model is no different. It uses a forced air cooling/ system redirected from the air conditioning when needed to keep cool and an independant heat system to warm the batteries when the batteyr gets too cold. Another bonus they never mention is that Panasonic is a subisdurary of Mitsubitshi, meaning the batteries effectively come from the same company as the rest of the vehicle, that is something that not even Tesla yet does, though they are headed in that direction. If you can't afford a Telsa, the i-Miev is the next best thing in my opinion as despite the Hype and better advertising the Leaf has less cargo capacity and until recently no battery management system meaning the batteries were suffering loss of capacity of 3-4% per year in comparison to the average i-Miev losing less than 1% every 2 years. I bought an i-Miev and I love it, I would never go back to a non electric car. Change times are nonsense as you will never be chraging from empty. It woiuld be like saying I would have to fill an 80 gallon gas tank with 80 gallons of gas every day no matter how far I go. The calculations given are extremes and no one will ever need to go that far every day. I do about 100km a day, it works out to about 2-4 hours of charging twice on my peak days, depending on temperature, etc. This is often split up as I will charge at work and at home. The longest i have ever changed is 6 hours and on my non work days I often end up charging less than 15 minutes after running local errands. It may not work for everyone, but it works for most.

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